Blue Coco Pole Bean - Organic

×

Blue Coco Pole Bean - Organic

Phaseolus vulgaris
(72 days snap) French heirloom with likely primary origin in the Rio Coco area of Nicaragua and Honduras. With chocolate-colored seed coats, bluish-purple pods, and green leaves tinged with purple, vining Coco makes a handsome plant. Can serve as a snap, shell or dry bean. Slightly curved pods with tender strings flatten as they age. Mild and sweet with a pleasing meaty flavor and nutty aftertaste. Can be harvested at 3" as filet beans, remain tender to 5" without getting stringy. Pods turn green when blanched. Freezes well. Supposedly tolerant of both heat and drought, its production slacked off in hot dry weather, recovering upon the return of rain and more temperate nights.


295 Blue Coco - Organic
Item Discounted
Price
A: 1/2oz for $2.50  
B: 2oz for $4.50  
C: 8oz for $12.00  
Log in
to start or resume an order

Additional Information

Pole Beans

  • Avg 30 seeds/half oz packet. 775–1500 seeds/lb. Half oz packet sows 7-10'.
  • Days to maturity are from emergence after direct sowing.

Culture: Though it can be fun to grow “climbing” beans on tripods or sunflowers, many folks grow them on 6–8" fencing. Plant 3–4" apart along the fence. Many pole bean varieties have strings that won’t annoy you if they’re picked early and often. Frequent and thorough picking keeps your vines vigorous and productive. Pick and compost the overgrown pods that got away, or cut them coarsely and add them to minestrone as suggested by Crystal Nichols of Greene, ME. If you don’t pick them, your plants will stop producing, satisfied they’ve fulfilled their reproductive mission.

One customer says, “Many people—even gardeners and cooks—have no idea how much better tasting pole beans are. Most bush beans are cardboard by comparison.”

Poles for Pole Beans

Nikos grows hers on tripods of long lashed poles. Gloria Seigars of New Sweden, ME, employs tall limber ash saplings that can be bent double without breaking. “Wired together, several of them make a nifty arbor and grand entrance to the vegetable garden.” Will Bonsall suggests letting them climb sunflower stalks. Give the sunflowers a two-week head start.

Plant about 5 seeds to a tripod, or 2 seeds to a sunflower.

Beans

  • All beans are open-pollinated.
  • Days to maturity are from emergence after direct sowing.

Culture: Tender, will not survive frost. Plant seeds 3–4" apart in rows 24–30" apart after all danger of frost has passed and soil has warmed. Minimum germination soil temperature 60°; optimal range 60–80°. White-seeded beans are generally more sensitive to cold soil temps than dark-seeded varieties. Legumes have moderate fertility needs and can fix their own nitrogen (inoculate with Guard-N Combo Legume Inoculant). Excessive nitrogen may induce some bush varieties to develop vines in moist hot weather.

Saving Seed: Saving bean seed is easy! Leave pods on the plants to dry. Hand shell, or stomp pods on a tarp. To ensure true-to-type seed, separate varieties by 30 feet.

Diseases:

  • ANTH: Anthracnose
  • BBS: Bacterial Brown Spot
  • CBMV: Common Bean Mosaic Virus
  • CTV: Curly Top Virus
  • DM: Downy Mildew
  • HB: Halo Blight
  • NY 15: NY 15 Mosaic Virus
  • PM: Powdery Mildew
  • PMV: Pod Mottle Virus
  • R: Rust
  • SC: Sclerotina

White mold, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, affects more than 300 plant species. In beans, low humidity, good air circulation and wider spacing, both between plants and between rows, reduce the likelihood of this soil-borne infection.

Germination Testing

For the latest results of our germination tests, please see the germination page.