Maidenhair Fern

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Maidenhair Fern

Adiantum pedatum 10-12" tall. Also known as Eastern Maidenhair Fern.

Delicate whorled form makes it one of our favorites. Glossy black stems curve up and then droop toward the ground with more narrow black stems growing in elegant arches from the main stem. Tiny distinct ginkgo-like green leaves line every stem.

Ferns make wonderful low-maintenance foliage plants that thrive in woodsy humus-rich soil and lend a serene aura to a shady garden or landscape. Mulch with 2" of leaves if necessary to keep crowns from drying out. All of our ferns are nursery propagated and not dug from the wild.

Prefers partial shade and slightly alkaline soil. Plant 12" apart. Native to eastern North America. Z2. (bare-root crowns)



698 Maidenhair Fern
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L698A: 6 for $23.00
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Additional Information

Ferns

Flowerless spore-producing perennials represented by more than 10,000 species worldwide, ranging from 70' tropical tree ferns to teensy plants sprouting from cracks in alpine rock. In Maine we enjoy lush fern displays all summer on the roadsides and in the woods. More and more people are using ferns as foundation plantings and in all kinds of shaded spots.
Ferns make wonderful low-maintenance foliage plants that thrive in moist woodsy humus-rich soil and lend a serene aura to a shady garden or landscape. Mulch if necessary to keep crowns from drying out.

Herbaceous Perennial Plants

When you receive your order, open the bags and check the stock immediately. Roots and crowns should be firm and pliable. Surface mold is harmless and will not affect the plant’s future performance. Store plants in their packaging in a cool (35–40°) location until you are ready to plant. If it’s going to be awhile, you can pot up your perennials.

Do not plant bare-root perennial plant crowns directly outdoors before danger of frost has passed. Wet and/or cold conditions for an extended period may cause rotting.

For more info:
About planting bare-root perennials.